Anonymous Q&A

Due to a high volume of submitted questions, it is impossible for Family Planning Plus to answer every question. Please check the frequently asked questions (FAQ) page to see if the answer to your question might be found there before submitting a question. If you do submit a question and do not see the answer to that question within a few days, please call one of our offices or contact your regular medical provider. Finally, the information included on this page should never replace a medical consultation, nor should it ever be used to make a diagnosis on your own. Please see a medical provider of your choice if you are experiencing any symptoms or require more detailed medical advice.

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Q: I was on Ortho Tri-Cyclen for about six months, and then switched to Aviane for the last two (this month included). I haven’t had any problems until now. My first period while on Aviane was totally normal. This month, it was slightly late (not even a full day, but obviously late), and it’s extremely light, and seems to be “drier” and very dark brown. There is some regular bleeding, but it is very minimal, and even on what used to be my heaviest days, one pad is way more than enough. My boyfriend and I had sex multiple times this month, as usual, but the only difference is, he didn’t pull out a few times. What’s going on with my period? Could I be pregnant?

Pregnancy is highly unlikely as long as you have been taking your pill as directed. However, no birth control method is 100% effective. There is always a slight risk of pregnancy (less than 1%) if you are using your birth control pill perfectly. The only way to know if you are pregnant is to take a pregnancy test. If you are worried about the possibility of being pregnant, call your medical care provider for a pregnancy test.

Menstrual irregularities at any time during the first three months of a new pill are very common when switching pill brands. Tri-Cyclen and Aviane have slightly different levels of hormones. After you have used your new pill three to six months, your periods should become more regular. You may have more or less bleeding and more or fewer days of bleeding with this new pill than you did with Tri-Cyclen. If your periods do not become regulated by the sixth month or if you are dissatisfied with the side effects of this new pill, contact the medical provider who prescribed your pill to discuss your options.

If you have no bleeding at all during the inactive pills of your third Aviane pack (the last week), take a pregnancy test. Do not stop taking your pill unless you test positive for pregnancy.

Q: im 18 and i want to have a baby but it didnt happen yet and its been 5 months im scared is somethin wrong with me?

It is natural for young women to want to have children. Babies are adorable, but they are also a lot of work and responsibility. Just be sure you fully understand the many lifestyle changes that occur with parenthood. Babies require constant care, patience, flexibility, unconditional love, dependability, lots of sacrifice, not to mention lots of money. While your friends are out having fun, you will need to be at home with the baby. You’re very young and have your whole life ahead of you. I would urge you to live a little first – enjoy being young – continue your education – become financially stable first.  That being said, if you feel you are definitely ready for parenthood and want to become pregnant, there are some steps you can take to help ensure a healthy pregnancy.

  • First, schedule a pre-pregnancy appointment with your doctor.  Let your doctor know you are planning a pregnancy.  Your doctor will review your family health history, be sure you have the proper immunizations, review your medications, schedule any needed tests, and discuss your present health behaviors/lifestyle and recommend changes.
  • Begin taking a daily multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid (a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop. Once you become pregnant, check with your doctor before using any prescription or over-the-counter medications (some medications are not safe to use during pregnancy).
  • Eat healthfully and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Be sure to get regular preventive medical care.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get regular exercise.  Walking, swimming, stretching, and housework are all good exercise choices before and during pregnancy.
  • Once you are pregnant, be sure to get early and regular pre-natal care.

The suggestions above will help prepare your body for pregnancy. Five months of trying to become pregnant and not succeeding does not mean there’s anything wrong with you. If you don’t become pregnant within a year once you take the above steps, you and/or your partner may have some fertility problems and should consult an infertility specialist for some suggestions.  He or she may also order tests to determine the problem.  If you don’t have the money for an infertility specialist, contact your primary care physician.  Best of luck!

Q: My husband and I had sex on the 3rd day of my period. However, I took an emergency contraceptive pill the next day (within 36 hours of our unprotected sex). Now almost 2 weeks later, I’ve noticed “spotting” of brown-colored blood (just like stains) without any of the usual discomfort related with period. Am I pregnant? I’m freaking out here, as we are not ready to have a baby yet.

Since the sex occurred during your regular period and you used emergency contraception, pregnancy is highly unlikely. Irregular menstrual bleeding is an extremely common side effect of emergency contraceptive pills so the bleeding you are now experiencing is normal. Your next period may be a little bit early or late. It may also be spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed for a few days more). If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test just to be on the safe side. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Please remember that emergency contraception should not be used as a regular method of birth control since it is less effective than other methods. In the meantime, do not continue have unprotected sex if you are not yet ready for pregnancy. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can discuss all of your contraceptive options with you and help you choose a method that’s best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: im 3 weeks pregnant and mistakenly took the next choice pill , will it hurt the baby

As I’m sure you know, pregnant women should always consult their doctor before taking any kind of medication. You don’t want to put anything in your body that could possibly harm the fetus. That being said, some women do take emergency contraception during the early stages of pregnancy before they know they are pregnant. Emergency contraception will not cause you to miscarry or abort. Also, research has shown that they do not increase the risk of birth defects.

To help ensure a healthy pregnancy and ultimately a healthy baby, it is important for any pregnant woman to get early and regular prenatal care. Choose a doctor soon and call him or her for an appointment. In the meantime:

  • Begin taking an over-the-counter prenatal vitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid (a B vitamin that prevents birth defects of the brain and spine).
  • If you smoke, quit and avoid second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • If you use street drugs, stop using them.
  • Eat healthfully and drink plenty of fluids.
  • Reduce the amount of stress in your life (if possible).
  • Get plenty of rest.

Best wishes for a healthy pregnancy!

Q: I had unprotected sex I took next choice however I didn’t take the second pill 12 hours later instead about 14-15 hours later should I worry about this? Should I buy another emergency contraception pill

You should be okay. Just remember that emergency contraceptive pills are not 100% effective even when used perfectly. A lot has to do with the timing of the sexual intercourse in relationship to your ovulatory day. If the sex occurred just before, during, or just after your period, pregnancy is less likely. If the sex occurred mid-cycle, pregnancy is more likely. If you ever need to use a 2-pill course of emergency contraception again, we recommend that you take both pills at the same time.

If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test test result. In the meantime, do not continue to have unprotected sex. Either abstain from sex or use condoms from start to finish for every act of intercourse.

Please remember that emergency contraception should not be used as a regular method of birth control since it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sex, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I have been taking ortho tri-cyclen lo for over 3 years. On the 7th I was diagnosed with a bacterial infection and given 7 days worth of flagyl (metronidazole). I had unprotected sex multiple times during the week I was taking flagyl, and my boyfriend came inside me multiple times. I was also on my period during this time. So my question is- should I be worried about possibly being pregnant?

The effectiveness of any type of estrogen-containing birth control pill may be impaired during treatment with some types of antibiotics.  However, the risk is very slight, and the supportive evidence is primarily limited to anecdotes from case reports and findings from uncontrolled or poorly controlled studies.  In fact, according to Contraceptive Technology, 19th Edition, it is not necessary to use a back up method of birth control while on antibiotics because they do not lower the levels of hormones in your blood to the point that you would be at risk for pregnancy. The only exception is the medication, rifampin (which is primarily used to treat tuberculosis).   To be on the safe side, however, we do recommend that our pill-users also use condoms or abstain from sex during antibiotic treatment and for at least one week after.

As long as you have been taking your birth control pill at the same time every day, pregnancy is highly unlikely, especially since the sex occurred during your period. If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test two weeks later if you still haven’t had any bleeding. Do not stop taking the pill unless you test positive for pregnancy. You should also be aware that some medications can cause menstrual irregularities so don’t panic if your next period comes later than normal or is lighter or heavier than usual.

For future reference, the following drugs or herbal products can decrease the effectiveness of the pill:

  • barbiturates
  • bosentan
  • carbamazepine
  • felbamate
  • griseofulvin
  • oxcarbazepine
  • phenytoin
  • rifampin
  • St. John’swort
  • topiramate
  • HIV protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

Q: Been on the nuvaring for about three weeks had unprotected sex the day after I got it. Now a couple of weeks later I’m noticing mild cramps and dark brown discharge and drowsiness could I be pregnant?

If you started the ring on the first day of your menstrual period (your first day of bleeding), the method begins working immediately and a back-up method (like condoms) is not needed for the first week of use. Also, if you started the ring immediately after using a different method of birth control (like the pill, the patch, or depo) and there was no gap in time between the two methods, the ring would have begun to work immediately and you would have been protected when the sex occurred. However, if you started the ring at any other time, you should have used a back-up method during the first week and you would not have been protected the day that the sex occurred. Continue to use the ring as directed. If you are more than a week late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test two weeks later if you still haven’t gotten your period. Do not stop using the ring unless you test positive for pregnancy. Please keep in mind that any hormonal birth control method (including the ring) can cause changes to your menstrual period. Hopefully, that is all that you are experiencing right now. If you have further questions about the ring, please contact the medical provider who prescribed the ring for you. We have just added the ring to our list of supplies so if you are interested in receiving the ring from us, please call us for an appointment.

Q: I’m pregnant, I’m not sure how far gone I am. I had sex on the 11th of June, my period came on the 28th of june. I then had sex on the 7th of july. What date would be by conception date?

If your June 28th period was normal (usual amount of bleeding and usual number of days bleeding), the pregnancy is most likely the result of the intercourse that occurred in July. However, an ultrasound can give you a more reliable answer. If you are intending to continue the pregnancy, your prenatal provider (pregnancy care doctor) will most likely perform an ultrasound at your first visit. Based on the results of the ultrasound, your doctor will be able to provide you with an estimated date of conception. Until you can see a doctor, eat healthfully, begin taking an over-the-counter prenatal vitamin, drink plenty of fluids, get plenty of rest, and avoid alcohol, tobacco, and street drugs. Good luck.

Q: If I am 14 years old and pregnant. Will Family Planning contact my parents about my pregnancy?

No, we will not contact your parents. Since we receive Title X funds, we must provide confidential care to all of our clients (regardless of your age). However, we will strongly encourage you to talk with your parents about your pregnancy. If you decide to continue your pregnancy, you will need to tell them eventually. If you decide to terminate your pregnancy and you live in Pennsylvania, you will need the consent of at least one of your parents (or obtain a judicial bypass from a judge) before you can have an abortion. In most cases, parents are a wonderful source of support and can provide you with invaluable advice. Please note that our agency does not provide pregnancy care, nor do we provide abortions. However, we can provide you with a pregnancy test to confirm your pregnancy and offer you counseling to help you make an informed decision. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for a confidential and free pregnancy test appointment. If you do decide to tell your parents, feel free to bring them along to your appointment. If you need more information about pregnancy and PA laws or a referral to pregnancy care provider or abortion clinic, please call us.

Q: Not sure if I am having irregular periods or if I might be pregnant. Is it possible to have red bleeding and be pregnant?

Red bleeding is possible during pregnancy, but not common. The only way to know if you are pregnant is to take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the most accurate results. Do not drink anything prior to your test as this may dilute your urine. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

You may also want to see a medical provider to determine the cause of your irregular periods. If you do not wish to be pregnant, they can also talk with you about your contraceptive options and help you choose a method that would both prevent pregnancy and regulate your periods. If you are attempting pregnancy, they can assess your health, discuss your lifestyle, and recommend healthy behaviors to help ensure a healthy pregnancy and a positive pregnancy outcome.

If you don’t have a regular medical care provider and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment.

Q: I was on nitrofurantn, and antibiotic which canceled out my birth control when I had unprotected sex. I took plan be the next morning and 12 hours later I had unprotected sex again. My boyfriend did NOT cum inside me. Is there still a chance I could get pregnant from this?

The effectiveness of any type of estrogen-containing birth control pill may be impaired during treatment with some types of antibiotics.  However, the risk is very slight, and the supportive evidence is primarily limited to anecdotes from case reports and findings from uncontrolled or poorly controlled studies.  In fact, according to Contraceptive Technology, 19th Edition, it is not necessary to use a back up method of birth control while on antibiotics because they do not lower the levels of hormones in your blood to the point that you would be at risk for pregnancy.  The only exception is the medication, rifampin (which is primarily used to treat tuberculosis).   To be on the safe side, however, we do recommend that our pill-users also use condoms or abstain from sex during antibiotic treatment and for at least one week after.

As long as you have been taking your birth control pill at the same time every day, pregnancy is highly unlikely. If you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. Do not stop taking the pill unless you test positive for pregnancy. You should also be aware that some medications can cause menstrual irregularities so don’t panic if your next period comes later than normal or is lighter or heavier than usual.

For future reference, the following drugs or herbal products can decrease the effectiveness of the pill:

  • barbiturates
  • bosentan
  • carbamazepine
  • felbamate
  • griseofulvin
  • oxcarbazepine
  • phenytoin
  • rifampin
  • St. John’swort
  • topiramate
  • HIV protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

Q: My boyfriend and I landed up engaging in anal sex. I am on the Yaz pill and happened to have been on my period. We did not have intercourse. Could I fall pregnant?

Sperm deposited inside the anus cannot cause pregnancy. If sperm leaks from the anus and enters the vagina, pregnancy is possible. However, if you have been taking your pill at the same time everyday, pregnancy is highly unlikely even if sperm may have leaked into the vagina.

Q: i had unprotected sex on my day 9 and 10,i have 32 day cycle.i took i pill after 40 hrs of my sex,after 1 week im having vaginal bleeding now,am i pregnant?when do i get my normal mensus?what should i do next?

Irregular menstrual bleeding is an extremely common side effect of emergency contraceptive pills so the bleeding you are now experiencing is normal. Your next period may be a little bit early or late. It may also be spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed for a few days more). If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

According to the manufacturer, the i-pill is approximately 85% effective when it is taken within 24-48 hours of the unprotected sex. The i-pill should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: i have been on the pill,but for the last few weeks been sick and the doctor gave me antibotics,and ive had sex and my boyfriens came in me more then once,and now my period is late,am i pregnant?and does the antibiotics wipe away the family planing?

The effectiveness of any type of estrogen-containing birth control pill may be impaired during treatment with some types of antibiotics.  However, the risk is very slight, and the supportive evidence is primarily limited to anecdotes from case reports and findings from uncontrolled or poorly controlled studies.  In fact, according to Contraceptive Technology, 19th Edition, it is not necessary to use a back up method of birth control while on antibiotics because they do not lower the levels of hormones in your blood to the point that you would be at risk for pregnancy.  The only exception is the medication, rifampin (which is primarily used to treat tuberculosis).   To be on the safe side, however, we do recommend that our pill-users also use condoms or abstain from sex during antibiotic treatment and for at least one week after.

The fact that you are a bit late for your period may simply be caused by your antibiotic use. Different types of medication can cause menstrual irregularities. Keep taking your pill at the same time every day. If you fail to have any bleeding at all during your sugar pill week, take a pregnancy test just to be on the safe side.  Do not stop taking the pill unless you test positive for pregnancy.

For future reference, the following drugs or herbal products can decrease the effectiveness of the pill:

  • barbiturates
  • bosentan
  • carbamazepine
  • felbamate
  • griseofulvin
  • oxcarbazepine
  • phenytoin
  • rifampin
  • St. John’swort
  • topiramate
  • HIV protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

Q: can you still spread gonorrhea after you get treated the first you get the pill the fourth day u get the shot but the fifth day you have sex but u suspose to wait a week?

It is extremely important for individuals who test positive for gonorrhea or chlamydia to wait a complete week before having sex. You need to give the medication time to work and to completely get rid of the infection. So unfortunately, yes, it is possible that you may have transmitted it to your sexual partner. Your partner should be tested and treated just in case. Contact the medical facility that treated you and let them know what happened.  They will want to schedule an appointment for your partner so that he or she can be tested and possibly presumptively treated. If you live near one of our offices, you can call us for an STD testing appointment for your partner, and it will be completely free and confidential. When you make the appointment, specify that your partner may have contracted gonorrhea due to contact with someone who was infected. Good luck!

Q: if you got your contraceptive injection and you got it three days late and you havr sex 3 tine bit diffrent days and he cums in you 3 time can you get pregnant

If you received your injection three days after it was due, you should be fine. You can get your next injection up to seven days after your due date, and you will not be at any greater risk for pregnancy. Of course, no method is 100% effective even when it is used perfectly so there is always a very slight risk of pregnancy.

Q: i have been on birth control for about a year now. me & my boyfriend were doing foreplay and he came in me. last week i missed four pills but i made them allup . can i get pregnant?

Yes, skipping and/or missing pills, even if you make them up, can decrease the effectiveness of your birth control.

We recommend using a back up method, like condoms or abstinence, for at least a week if you have missed moare that one pill.

Continue to take your pills every day, and begin a new pack as scheduled. If you are more than 1 week late with your next period,

perform a pregnancy test.

Q: Whats wrong? I took two pills late in a row I have lower back pain and a little brown spotting the last two days that doesn’t last alld two weeks ago I switched from beyaz to microgestin me and my bf do not use any other protection I have Ben

Anytime you skip pills or take pills late, you are decreasing the effectiveness of your birth control method.

We recommend using a back up method, like abstinence or condoms for 1 week if you have missed more than

one pill.  Not only can skipping/missing pills decrease the pregnancy protection, it will also decrease the cycle control. If you are late with one or more

pills, you may have signs that your body is reacting to the withdrawal of hormones. You may begin to have period symptoms: cramping, spotting, maybe even some period bleeding.

Continue to take your pills every day, and begin a new pack as scheduled. If your period is more than one week late, perform a pregnancy test.

Q: i had my last mensus 1 week ago.now again i have bleeding. i had sex in this last week. but i tuk i-pill to prevent pregnancy. could i b pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected sex, there is the risk of pregnancy.

Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs)  help prevent pregnancy by delaying ovulation. They do this by delivering a dose of progesterone into your system. (Progesterone is one of the hormones that regulates your cycles; it is also one of the hormones in regular birth control pills.) You should have a period within 1 to 3 weeks after taking the ECP.

Your next period may be a little earlier or later than usual. It may be lighter, heavier or spottier than usual. If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: I was off of my birth control for about a month and 1 week. Me and my boyfriend had unprotected sex. I ended my period that Friday we had sex that Saturday in which he did ejaculated inside me. I couldn’t start my new pack of pills till Sunday. Is it possible that I’m pregnant ? I’m currently still taking the pills like I normally would everyday . If I am and bc I’m on the pill when should I take a pregnacy test to see if I am?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If you did not take birth control pills for 5 weeks, then you were not protected from pregnancy for those weeks.

Continue taking your current birth control pills daily, as scheduled. If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: i got physical with my boyfrien 3months back….though we dint have intercourse but he just happend to tpuch his penis to my vagina. i got my period the next month but in the following month i dint get my periods inspite of taking the tablet deviry. are there chances of pregnancy?

It is very unlikely for pregnancy to occur from the penis touching the outside of the vagina. However, if he “went in” for “just a minute”, there is the risk of pregnancy.

If you have been taking the birth control pills for at least 7 consecutive days, then your pregnancy protection should be effective. So, if this incident occurred after the first week of pill use, the likelihood of pregnancy is low.

It can be common to have irregular periods or to skip a period when first starting the birth control pills. Continue to take your pills every day. If you skip two periods in a row, follow-up with your doctor or clinic for evaluation.

Q: i had chlamydia and trich for 4 months and recently was treated/took my medicine as directed. i also missed two of my periods during this time (early april and early may). i discontinued using my birthcontrol (apri) the day before i started taking the sti medication (i dont want to be on birthcontrol anymore). so my question is, when will i get my period again? i know it might take 1-3 months to get regulated after stopping the birthcontrol but i’m afraid the chlamydia affected my periods also. any information will help! my next period is supposed to be june 7th.thank you!

 You are correct that it can take your body 1-3 months to become adjusted to not being on the pills. However, you will ovulate prior to having a bleed. Therefore, if you are having unprotected intercourse, you could be pregnant. The medications used for treatment of the infections should not affect your period.

If you are not planning a pregnancy, do not have unprotected intercourse. Abstinence or condoms are good methods of birth control if you are not interested in a hormonal form of birth control.

 If your period doesn’t come in June, and you have been having unprotected sex, do a pregnancy test. If you have not been sexually active, give your body a month or two to adjust. If your periods have not returned after 3 months, schedule an appointment with your doctor for a check-up.

 

Q: well okay so i just had a baby april 7 and on may 15 i had sex so the next day i went to buy plan b pills and now oam bleeding my abtomen hurts i dont know if is my period because i also had a argument with someone on may 19 and in the moment my abdomen stared to hurt relly bad and stared bleeding. WHY ?!

You should have a period within 1 to 3 weeks after taking emergency contraceptives. This period may be lighter, heavier or spottier than usual. You may or may not have cramping with this bleed. The bleeding is most likely due to the Plan B; that your period started on the day of your argument is probably coincidental.

Keep in mind, that your periods may take a few months to return on a normal monthly schedule, especially since you just had a baby and recently took Plan B.

If you are not planning another pregnancy right away, consider using a reliable, long term method of birth control. You have a variety of options: abstinence, condoms, birth control pills, patch, the vaginal ring or the DepoProvera injection.

Q: is it a guarentee that i would get pregnant while on birth control pills for 8 months if i missed a pill a day before i ovulated

No, it is not a guarantee. In fact, missing only one pill does not significantly increase your risk of pregnancy. Hopefully, you made your pill up correctly by taking it as soon as you remembered and then taking your next pill at the regular time or by taking two pills the next day.

When you are on the pill, you do not ovulate. That is how the pill works. It changes the hormone levels in your body (it makes them similar to the levels produced when you are pregnant). When your brain sees these different hormone levels, it thinks you are alrealy pregnant and sends a message back down to your ovaries instructing them not to ovulate. As long as your brain sees these hormone levels, you do not ovulate. However, if you miss two or more hormone pills in a row or if you forget to take the very first hormone pill in a new pack, your hormone levels may go back to where they were before you were on the pill, and then you may ovulate. (Your hormone levels will build up during your three weeks of hormone use and will continue to protect you from pregnancy during you period week.)  That is why it is so important to take your pill at the same time every day – to maintain those hormone levels.

Of course, even when used perfectly, the birth control pill is not 100% effective. If you miss your next period, take a pregnancy test just in case.

Q: I have been bmeeding for over a month and I haven’t had sex in over two years

Contact your regular medical care provider and request an appointment. If you don’t have a regular provider, you may want to look in the yellow pages for a gynecologist.  He or she will probably want to run some tests to make sure that your excessive bleeding is not the result of a more serious condition, disease, or trauma (injury).

Up to 10% of women may experience excessive bleeding at one time or another. Periods of excessive vaginal bleeding may occur when estrogen and/or progesterone levels become out of whack for one reason or another.  This can occur even when no disease or trauma is present.

Sometimes this is due to an anovulatory cycle.  Anovulation occurs when a menstrual cycle occurs that does not result in the release of an egg from one of the ovaries. When a woman does not produce an egg, there is still stimulation of the uterus from the hormone estrogen. Progesterone, a very important hormone produced by a growing egg, is absent. Therefore, the lining of the uterus becomes unusually thick and enlarged which results in the abnormal vaginal bleeding. This is more likely to occur in adolescents and women approaching menopause.

It is very important to see a medical provider, especially if this continues. Please make an appointment as soon as possible just to make sure nothing more serious is happening.

Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/vaginal_bleeding/page2_em.htm

Q: I just switched from nuva ring to the depo shot and had a pelvic exam on thursday. but now my clit is sore…it hurts to touch it. i also sometimes feel like i need to pee and can’t. the dr said i dont have any std’s but i am still very nervous it isn’t red or swollen, it just is tender… what is wrong with me

Your clitoral sensitivity may be due to excessive or rough clitoral stimulation during sex. You may want to talk to your partner about being a bit more gentle during sex. You may also want to avoid sex for a few days. Or, if you masturbate frequently, you may want to take a break until your clitoris is no longer sore.

If you are not engaging in any type of clitoral stimulation (sex or masturbation) or if your clitoris remains sore even after stopping sex for a few days, contact the medical provider who prescribed your Depo and explain your symptoms. If your frequent urge to urinate continues, you may want to be evaluated for a possible urinary tract infection as well.

Q: I am 16 and would like to get on the pill without my parents knowing. If I come to clinic will I be able to get it without parental consent?

Yes, if you make an appointment at one of our offices, your visit would be confidential (i.e., we would not inform your parents of your visit). We will encourage you to eventually discuss your decision to use birth control with your parents, but we certainly can’t force you to do so.

If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you and ask them if their services are confidential. Most likely they will be confidential. If they receive Title X government funds (as we do), they must provide free and confidential services to anyone under the age of 18.

Q: Unfortunately I have begun to masturbate fairly often, sometimes bumping to 3 times a day, recently I noticed a small bump on my penis itself. This is not the first time this has happened and the bumps are similar to zits, when squeezed they leak a puss like substance, but go away when popped and cleaned. Is this just from too much masturbation or may I have an STD?

The only way to know for sure is to be checked by a medical provider. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment for a free STD testing visit. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: i just stared microgestin fe 1/20 june11 i had unprotected sex the next day and so on can i be pregnant

Yes, pregnancy is possible. You need to either abstain or use condoms for the first seven days of the pill. However, if you started the pill with your period (taking your first pill during your period), pregnancy is much less likely.

Since you just started the pill, you will probably notice some menstrual irregularities for the first few months. These irregularities may include a missed period and spotting or bleeding in between periods. After three months of pill use, your periods will become more regular and you will probably have fewer days of bleeding and less blood during your period.

If you haven’t had any bleeding at all by the time you start your second pill pack, take a pregnancy test. Do not stop taking your pills unless you test positive for pregnancy.

Q: Me and mu boyfriend had sex 2 days ago unprotected and I missed a birth control pill the day before that but I just got my period on the sugar pills today could I be pregnent?

If your period is normal, pregnancy is highly unlikely. Though missing a pill does slighly increase the risk of pregnancy, the risk is still relatively low.

That being said, it is still extremely important to take your pills as directed.  If you frequently miss pills, you may want to contact the medical provider who prescribed your pill to discuss a method change. If you would like to stay on the pill and you have a cell phone, you can set your alarm to go off at a certain time each day to remind you to take a pill. You can also register for free daily text reminders on www.bedsider.org.

Q: I had unprotected sex with this boy 2 and a half days ago. He’s not old enough to purchase plan b..by tomorrow we have no hope. I have no one to go to for help. Please suggestions!!

If you can talk to your parents, they can buy the medication for you. Otherwise, please call your local Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office right away. If you are under 18, you can receive Plan B at no cost. Plan B can be used up to five days after unprotected sex. Family Planning staff can also talk with you about all of your birth control options and help you choose a method that’s best for you.  Your services will be strictly confidential (meaning that no one will contact your parents unless you want them to). In the meantime, do not have unprotected sex again. Either use condoms or abstain from sexual intercourse.

The chances of the unprotected sex resulting in pregnancy are dependent on a number of different things. Some of these include the number of times one has intercourse (of course, the more times you have unprotected intercourse, the greater the chance of pregnancy) and the timing of the intercourse in relationship to your menstrual cycle. You are less likely to become pregnant if the intercourse occurred just before, during, or just after your menstrual period, and more likely to become pregnant if it occurred mid-cycle. 

If you do end up using Plan B, please keep in mind that one of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more).

Regardless of whether or not you use Plan B, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Q: I’m on birthcontrol, my Period ended on the 11th. I had sex with my boyfriend on the 16th and 17th without a condom. I started spotting on the 19th what could this be?

It is difficult to answer your question without knowing what type of birth control you are using, if you are using it correctly, and how long you have been using it.

If you are on any type of hormonal method, spotting is normal during the first few months of use since your body has to adjust to the new hormone levels. If you are on the pill and you missed a pill or took it late, you can also expect some spotting since there was a variation in your hormone levels. If you are on Seasonale or Seasonique, you can expect some spotting from time to time. If you are on the Depo shot or the implant, irregular bleeding and spotting is also normal.

Whatever type of birth control you are using, it is important that you use it correctly for maximum protection. If you are using your method correctly, the risk of pregnancy is extremely low.

If you continue to have mid-cycle bleeding or spotting and you are concerned about it, please contact the medical provider who prescribed your method.

Q: I had sex on saturday and missed my pills from that day until today but today iv had light bleeding and my period doesn’t start until 9 days from now could I be pregnant? And yesterday I was spotting

Anytime you skip your birth control pills, you are decreasing your protection from pregnancy. Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. You are spotting/bleeding because your body is adjusting to not having the hormones (from the pills) in your system.

Restart your birth control pills as soon as possible. Pick up where you left off in your pill pack. Begin a new pill pack as scheduled. In the meantime, do not have unprotected intercourse until you have completed the current pill pack and have taken at least 7 days of the new pill pack. Either abstain from intercourse or use condoms to prevent pregnancy.

You will most likely continue to experience some spotting/bleeding until you are back on a regular schedule of taking the pill everyday. Your period may be a little earlier or later or longer than usual; this is normal. Your periods should return to a regular schedule within the next month or two.

Q: Im on the pill and my periods have been ending on a friday, i just had a UTI a week ago, and last night, knowing my period was over i had sex, but i was really dry, and he didnt cum, but my clit is sore and from him rubbing it too hard i think but now im bleeding again. is this a problem?

Even when you’re on the pills, things can affect your menstrual cycle. Stress, illness, medications, and lack of sleep can cause you to have irregular spotting or bleeding. Continue taking your pills every day. Your cycle should return to normal within a month or two.

You may be having bleeding due to irritation to your genital area as a result of friction. Abstaining from sex and applying some over the counter antibiotic ointment to the area may help decrease the discomfort. The genital area usually heals quite quickly, so you should be back to normal with a week or so.

Q: i had unprotected sex twice on the last day of my period & he certainly cummed both times,what are my chances of being pregnant

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. The risk will differ based on the timing of your menstrual cycle. If you are around ovulation time, the risk of pregnancy will be increase. If you are close to starting your period or during your period, the risk is less.

Q: I had sex with my boyfriend yesterday and today I started to have some pelvic pain kind of like a small cramp. I was wondering should I be worried about the pain?

 Unless the pain becomes worse, or you begin having symptoms of a vaginal infection, you could probably wait and see what happens. A warm heating pad and over the counter pain relievers can help decrease the discomfort.

Q: I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend and he ejaculated inside of me, I came on my period 10-15 minutes later and I have loads of big blood clots why Is this? and also we had unprtected sex 3 weeks before and he ejaculated in me

Having intercourse during your period may increase bleeding.  Female orgasm causes contractions of the uterus. When the uterus contracts, it may push out some clots. During your period, you are less likely to be fertile.

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy.

Q: If my boyfriends condom with sperm went inside of me, am I most likely pregnant ?

If semen spilled into your vagina, there is the possibility of pregnancy. Plan B would be a good option. Plan B is available for purchase over the counter at most pharmacies.

The likelihood of pregnancy will depend on where you were at within your menstrual cycle when the mishap occurred. If you were mid-cycle, which is ovulation time, then you would be fertile, and pregnancy would be more likely. If you were close to starting your period or during your period, the chance of pregnancy would be lower.

Q: One night my boyfriend urinated before we left his house. When we got in his truck he started fingering me. This was 6 days ago. My period is about four days late. Could I be pregnant?

If you and your partner have been having unprotected intercourse, meaning penis in the vagina, then, yes, there is the risk of pregnancy. You cannot become pregnant by your partner fingering you. Urine does not contain sperm.

If your period is more than 7 days late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: so my boyfriend and i had sex with a condom, when we finished he came in the condom, but stayed in me. also when he finally pulled out the condom came off and spilled on me, then we cleaned ourselves off, but then he went back me bare, can we conce

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If your partner’s semen was spilled or ejaculated into your vagina, there is the possibility that you could become pregnant.

Q: “i had sex with my boyfriend on 5th day of my period and i took i-pill after that. it was an protected sex. he had wore condomn. after 13 days we had sex again and i tuk i-pill.. can i becum preegnant ??”

The morning after pill (Plan B, Next Choice, i-pill) is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred. Therefore, pregnancy is possible, but your risk is reduced. If you correctly used a condom in addition to the i-pill the second time you had sex, pregnancy is highly unlikely.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

The morning after pill should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I am on birth control and I already had my period this month, I’ve been getting cramps and I start randomly bleeding. What is going on!?

If you are on the birth control pills, make sure that you are taking them correctly & consistently. Being late with or skipping pills can cause cramping and irregular bleeding. If you are on another birth control method, be sure that you are using it correctly.

Many women experience menstrual irregularity at some time or another. Irregularities like cramping and spotting can be caused by stress, illness, and hormonal fluctuations. If this is the case, it is usually not a concern. Your cycles will return to normal within a month or two. A warm heating pad, hot bath and Ibuprofen or Tylenol can all help decrease the discomfort of cramping.

There are other reasons for persistent cramping and bleeding. You may have a vaginal infection. You made need an adjustment in your birth control. If your bleeding/spotting continues for 2 or more months, call your doctor or clinic for an appointment.

 

Q: I stopped using the nuvaring 3 weeks before I had unprotected sex, he came on my vagina some got inside. Two days later I started my period on time, took the Plan B pill just in case, and had a normal cycle for 7 days. Could I still get pregnant even though I had my period and took Plan B?

If you had a normal period two days after unprotected intercourse, it is unlikely that you became pregnant. However, if you are no longer using the NuvaRing or another form of birth control, you are no longer protected and there is the risk of pregnancy.

Q: do you count your upcoming period or your nxt 1 to know if your pregnant

In order to do the natural family planning or rhythm method, you must keep track of your menstrual cycles.  A menstrual cycle lasts from the first day of one period to the first day of the next period. The first day of bleeding is considered day 1 of your menstrual cycle. If it is 28 days until the start of your next period, then you have a 28 day cycle. Maintaining a menstrual cycle chart for about 3 to 6 months will give you a better idea of the average length of your cycles.

Most women ovulate in the middle of their cycle, about 11 to 14 days after the start of a period.

Keep in mind, that things like stress, illness, changes in sleep, and hormonal fluctuations can alter menstrual cycles, making ovulation(and periods) occur earlier or later than usual. Therefore, this method has limitations when used as a birth control method. When used as a birth control method, it is about 75% effective.

If you need more information, contact your doctor or clinic. There are also several good online sources that have information about charting your menstrual cycles.

Q: my boyfriend pre cumed in me, i took my plan b pill the same day, but took the second pill 5 hours late.am i still protected?

There is a slightly greater risk of pregnancy in your case since you took your second pill five hours late. However, your risk is still extremely low because of your Plan B use and since your boyfriend did not actually ejaculate inside the vagina.

If this should happen again, either use Plan B One-Step (so you only have to take one pill) or take both pills at the same time (rather than 12 hours apart).

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more). However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

Of course, Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: how much semen could it take to get a girle pregnant

One drop. There are hundreds of millions of sperm in a single ejaculation of an average male. It only takes one sperm to fertilize an egg.

However, pregnancy risk is also dependent on many other factors. Some of these include the number of times one has sexual intercourse (of course, the more times you have unprotected sex, the greater the chance of pregnancy) and the timing of the sex in relationship to the menstrual cycle. A woman is less likely to become pregnant if the intercourse occurred just before, during, or just after her menstrual period, and more likely to become pregnant if it occurred mid-cycle. 

In order for pregnancy to occur, a sperm must unite with an egg or ovum (fertilization), and then the fertilized egg must imbed itself into the uterine wall. Each month, a woman ovulates (releases an egg from one of her ovaries into the fallopian tube). Usually, ovulation occurs mid-cycle (about two weeks before the menstrual period). The egg only lives 12-24 hours after it leaves the ovary so there is really only a brief period of time each month when pregnancy is possible. However, it is possible for pregnancy to occur several days after sex. This is because sperm can live inside a woman’s body 3-5 days. If the woman ovulates a few days after sex and there is still live sperm inside her body, pregnancy is possible.

Q: I have been on Loestrin 24 for about 3 weeks now. i havent taken it at the exact same time everyday. im on the high end of fertility right now. my boyfriend did cum inside of me today. could i end up pregnant?

As long as you have been taking your pill within a three hour time period, your risk of pregnancy is extremely low. When you are on the birth control pill, you do not ovulate. When you fail to ovulate, you cannot become pregnant.

Of course, no birth control method is perfect even if you use it perfectly. However, when you use the pill perfectly, you have less than a 1% risk of pregnancy. If you miss a pill by 24 hours or more, your risk of pregnancy increases.

Q: If a man spills his cum in a woman’s second hole, does that mean that she is pregnant?

A woman has three openings between her legs: a urethra (she pees out of this opening), a vagina (the birth canal), and an anus (from which solid waste is expelled). If semen is deposited inside the vagina (the middle opening), pregnancy is possible, but not inevitable.

The risk of pregnancy is dependent on a number of different things. Some of these include the number of times one has sexual intercourse (of course, the more times you have unprotected sex, the greater the chance of pregnancy) and the timing of the sex in relationship to the menstrual cycle. A woman is less likely to become pregnant if the intercourse occurred just before, during, or just after her menstrual period, and more likely to become pregnant if it occurred mid-cycle. 

In order for pregnancy to occur, a sperm must unite with an egg or ovum (fertilization), and then the fertilized egg must imbed itself into the uterine wall. Each month, a woman ovulates (releases an egg from one of her ovaries into the fallopian tube). Usually, ovulation occurs mid-cycle (about two weeks before the menstrual period). The egg only lives 12-24 hours after it leaves the ovary so there is really only a brief period of time each month when pregnancy is possible. However, it is possible for pregnancy to occur several days after sex. This is because sperm can live inside a woman’s body 3-5 days. If the woman ovulates a few days after sex and there is still live sperm inside her body, pregnancy is possible.

Q: I just went on a generic form of birthcontrol that I was on, I missed 4 pills on the first.pack & doubledup. I had unprotecyed sex alot and he came in me everytime. now I feel sick to mu stomache everynight, im moody(crying over everything) boobs r sore, sleep longer than uusual, threw up one mornimg and have slight cramping with spotting randomly. what could.it be?! help!

If you have only been on the pill for one month, there are two possibilities.

1) You could be pregnant. If you had unprotected sex during the first week of your pills, the pill would not have prevented pregnancy. Also, missed pills reduce the effectiveness of the pill and increase the risk of pregnancy.

2) You may be experiencing side effects of the hormones in the pill. During the first three months or so of a new pill, you can expect spotting, a missed period, irregular bleeding, breast tenderness or soreness, nausea and sometimes vomiting, fatigue, and moodiness. These side effects should go away once your body adjusts to the new hormone level.

If you don’t have any bleeding at all during your sugar pills (the last week of your pill pack), take a pregnancy test. If it is negative, repeat the test two weeks later. From now on, take your pills at the same time every day. Do not miss any more pills. Do not stop taking your pills unless you test positive for pregnancy.

Since you are frequently missing pills, you may want to contact the medical provider who prescribed your pill to discuss a method change. If you would like to stay on the pill and you have a cell phone, you can set your alarm to go off at a certain time each day to remind you to take a pill. You can also register for free daily text reminders on www.bedsider.org.

Q: If a man keeps getting hard but doesn’t ejaculate, does he develop stomach pains?

This condition, epididymal hypertension, is better known by the slang term, “blue balls”. It  is the temporary congestion (build-up) of fluid in the testicles and prostate caused by prolonged sexual arousal without ejaculation. A man may experience the sensation of testicular pain or a dull ache in the pelvic and/or testicular area. While common, not all men experience this.

The easiest treatment for this is ejaculation. However, even without release, the condition will subside on its own within an hour or two.  Although rare, epididymal hypertension could last as long as 24 hours.

Other ways to help alleviate “blue balls” is by lying on the left side with knees bent up towards the stomach, taking a cold shower, applying ice to the area and wearing a jock strap. 

Q: My husband and I had sex 4 days ago while I was fertile and the condom had a big hole in the tip and he didn’t pull out until after ejaculation. Is there a good chance that I could be pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If you had unprotected intercourse (even when its due to condom breakage) during your fertile time, then you could have become pregnant.

If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: If Ive had genital herpes and I had sex with my girlfriend how easy is it for her to get it?

Genital herpes (HSV2) is most commonly caused  by the Herpes simplex virus type 2. The Herpes virus, as with most viruses, can lay dormant in your system for long periods of time. Some type of stress occurs in the body, the immune system becomes decreased, the virus is activated, and a “Herpes outbreak” can occur. However, some people can have the HSV2 and never have any symptoms or outbreaks.

We do know that shedding occurs during an active outbreak, and it is best to abstain from sexual activity during that time. Studies have shown that, even when you are not having an active outbreak, you are still shedding the HSV2.  The amount or level of virus that is being shed differs at any given time, so it is impossible to know when  your viral level is high or low.  One way to protect yourself (and your partner) is to use condoms during sex. That being said, condoms are not 100% effective. HSV2 can occur anywhere in the “boxer short”  area, so condoms do have their limitations.

Valtrex and Acyclovir are medications that can help control Herpes outbreaks. Valtrex is approved for daily use. When used daily, Valtrex can decreased the amount of shedding and decrease the number of outbreaks. Daily therapy is another way to help protect your partner.

So, getting back to your question: Will your partner get Herpes? Becoming infected with a virus will depend on a few things. First, the amount of exposure, i.e. the level of your viral load. Second, the frequency of exposure, i.e. the number of times exposed. Third, the general health of the person being exposed. Even with all the research that has been done on HSV2, we still really don’t fully know why some people are exposed but do not become infected.

Unfortunately, there is no concrete answer when it comes to sexually transmitted infections. Practicing safe sex every time is always a good idea. If you have any concerns about infection, STD screenings are available.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer free STD screenings for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: My girlfriend is on birth control, and for the past few weeks has taken it consistently on time. However, during her week of inactive pills, she is only having her period from the 3rd to 5th day. Is this something to be concerned about, as this was actually relatively similar to her schedule before she went on birth control (3 to 4 days of bleeding)

As long as your partner is taking her pills correctly & consistently, it is unlikely that she will become pregnant.

There are several benefits, other than birth control, that the pills provide to women. Oral contraceptives can help decrease ovarian and uterine cancer,

and helps to prevent certain types of breast cancer.  They can help decrease the incidence of pelvic infection and tubal pregnancies.

The pills help women to have regular 28 day menstrual cycles. Along with this regularity, pills may help lighten and/or shorten periods. Any bleeding or

spotting during the inactive pill week is considered a period. If your partner’s period is only 2 or 3 days, that is okay. Many women enjoy having

shorter/lighter periods.

Make sure your partner continues to take her pills every day, around the same time. Taking them correctly maintains  good effectiveness for

both birth control and cycle control.

Q: 9 weeks postpartum, had sex using a condom. It was rough and I’m sore and having bright pink spotting, could I be pregnant?

Pregnancy is highly unlikely as long as you used the condom correctly and it was intact when he withdrew. The pink spotting that you are experiencing is probably due to the recent sexual encounter.  However, if you are worried, wait five weeks and then take a pregnancy test. If the soreness does not go away or the bleeding becomes heavier, call your doctor.

Just so you know: Women who exclusively breastfeed (do not supplement at all with formula) can actually use this as a method of birth control. LAM (the Lactation Amenorrhea Method) suppresses ovulation and can be used as a birth control method for up to six months after delivery as long as the woman has not had any menstrual periods.

Q: can you get pregnat if the sex was less then 30 secounds and the pinis wasnt in all the way and the guy didnt cum??

Yes, pregnancy is possible but unlikely. This is because of pre-seminal fluid or pre-ejaculate. Pre-seminal fluid leaks out of the penis prior to ejaculation.  Neither partner usually notices this leakage. Sometimes this fluid contains sperm that is left in the urethra from a previous ejaculation. However, if a man urinates between ejaculations before having sex again, it will help clear the urethra of sperm and decrease the likelihood of pregnancy.

It would be best to use condoms or another method of birth control when engaging in sexual contact.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can talk with you about all of your birth control options and help you choose one that is best for you. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: i ahd sex on moday with a condom it didt break. on thursday i see a brown dishacrge, my period is suppose to be coming around this time. can i be pregnant?

Pregnancy is highly unlikely if you used the condom correctly (from start to finish) and as long as it was intact when he withdrew. More than likely, the brown discharge is just the beginning of your period.

However, if you are a week or more late for your period, take a pregnancy test just to be on the safe side. Use first morning urine for the best results.  If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result.

If you are interested in trying a more effective hormonal method and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can discuss all of your contraceptive options with you and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: my daughter has missed a couple of pills last moth doubled up on them and did not start her period when she should have this month.does she still take her new start of pills when she is suppose to?

Yes, she should start her new pill pack at the same time. Whenever you forget to take a pill, you should take it as soon as you remember and then take the next pill at the regular time. If you’re about to take a pill and realize that you missed yesterday’s pill, then take both pills at the same time. If you miss two or more pills in a row, take two pills a day until you are caught up and then resume the one pill daily schedule.

If you miss a pill by more than 24 hours, you should use condoms in addition to the pill for the next 7-14 days. Missing pills or taking them late increases the risk of pregnancy and can affect bleeding patterns. That is why her period did not start at the regular time.

If your daughter regularly forgets to take pills, she may want to think about switching to a method that does not require daily use. If she wants to remain on the pill, she needs to take them around the same time every day. If she has a cell phone, she could set her alarm to go off every day at the same time to remind her to take a pill. If she brushes her teeth around the same time everyday, she could keep the pills next to her toothbrush. She can also sign up for daily text reminders on www.bedsider.com.

Q: i got physical with my boyfrien 3months back….though we dint have intercourse but he just happend to touch his penis to my vagina. i got my period the next month but in the following month i dint get my periods inspite of taking the tablet deviry. are there chances of pregnancy?i just wanted to ask because i have heard if you get your periods after intecourse you are certainly not pregnant.

Some women do experience some vaginal bleeding after they become pregnant, but the bleeding is generally not as heavy as a normal period. If there was sperm on your boyfriend’s penis when it touched your vagina, pregnancy is possible, but your risk is extremely low. Take a pregnancy test just to be sure. Use first morning urine for the best results.

If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, please use condoms from start to finish for all sex acts. If you are interested in trying a hormonal method of birth control and you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment. We can discuss your contraceptive options with you and help you choose one that best fits your lifestyle. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Menstrual irregularities (including missed periods) can occur for a number of different reasons. Pregnancy is just one possibility.  Irregular periods can be caused by hormonal imbalances, perimenopause, illness or infection, use of certain medications, and other more serious conditions.  Women who are dieting or exercising excessively may also skip periods. In addition, increased stress levels and changes in routine may affect the regularity of menstrual cycles.  If you have skipped more than one period and you are not using a progestin-only method of birth control, you should probably be evaluated by a medical professional to determine the cause.

Q: I had sex on march 9th then my period came on later that day which last five days. then i had sex on march 24 now im 12 weeks prego which one could be the father?

If your period was a normal period, it is unlikely that the first partner is the biological father. However, ultrasound results may better predict the timing of conception. When you have your first ultrasound, ask your doctor when he thinks you might have conceived. If the ultrasound results cannot accurately predict your conception date, you may need to resort to paternity testing to determine the biological father.

Q: I had sex for 10 times with guy has a larger penis than my boyfreind could this make my vagina big that my boyfreind find out?

It is extremely unlikely that your boyfriend would notice a difference. However, it is possible that your new partner may have had a sexually transmitted disease. If he did, you may also be infected. If you are infected, and you have sex with your boyfriend, he could become infected also. It would be best to abstain from sex with your boyfriend until you can determine that you are infection-free.

Many people who have STDs do not have any symptoms. For example, 75% of women infected with chlamydia do not have any symptoms whatsoever. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for a free STD screening visit. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: I’m on birthcontrole and penecillin for strep throat. We had oral sex and he ejaculated. I made sure to lick all the semen off his penis. We had unprotected sex after and he pulled out. It’s been 6 days and I feel very bloated and I think I may be constipated. My period ended 2 days before we had sex. Could I be pregnant?

Pregnancy is highly unlikely as long as you have been using your birth control as directed. To be extra cautious, we do recommend that our patients use condoms in addition to their regular hormonal method when they are also using antibiotics. The effectiveness of any type of estrogen-containing birth control pill may be impaired during treatment with some types of antibiotics.  However, the risk is very slight, and the supportive evidence is primarily limited to anecdotes from case reports and findings from uncontrolled or poorly controlled studies.  In fact, according to Contraceptive Technology, 19th Edition, it is not necessary to use a back up method of birth control while on antibiotics because they do not lower the levels of hormones in your blood to the point that you would be at risk for pregnancy.  The only exception is the medication, rifampin (which is primarily used to treat tuberculosis).   

Since no birth control method is 100% effective, however, pregnancy is always a possibility. Keep using your birth control as directed. If you are a week or more late for your next period, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive test result. Do not stop using your regular method of birth control unless you test positive for pregnancy.

Q: i had unprotected sex and he came inside of me two days after i supposedly ovulated could i become pregnant

Anytime you have unprotected sex, pregnancy is possible. The risk is increased if you have sex near the time of ovulation.

If you do not wish to be pregnant and if it has been less than five days since the intercourse, you could use Plan B to reduce your risk.

Plan B One-step is a pill you can take after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy. It works best if it is used within the first 24 hours after sex but can be used up to 120 hours (or five days) after unprotected sex with decreased effects after the first three days.  The sooner you use Plan B, the more effective it is.

Plan B works by delaying ovulation (the monthly release of an egg), and possibly by interfering with fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) and implantation (when the fertilized egg implants itself into the uterine lining). If you are already pregnant, it will not terminate the pregnancy. According to the manufacturer, the treatment prevents seven of eight pregnancies that otherwise would have occurred.

If you are 17 or older, you can purchase Plan B at most drug stores without a prescription. You will need to ask the pharmacist for Plan B as it is located behind the counter. You may also need to show ID to prove your age. Plan B is around $50. If you are under 17, you will need a prescription from a doctor. You can also get Plan B from a Family Planning or Planned Parenthood clinic. We offer Plan B at all of our clinics at a reduced cost. Some individuals qualify for free services.

One of the most common side effects of Plan B use is menstrual irregularity.  Therefore, your next period could be earlier than usual, later than usual, or spotty (meaning you may bleed for a few days, stop, and then bleed some more).

Plan B should not be used as a regular method of birth control as it is less effective than other methods.  If you are going to continue to have sexual contact, you may want to think about using a regular form of birth control.  If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your contraceptive options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Regardless of whether you use Plan B or not, take a pregnancy test if you are a week or more late for your next period. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test every two weeks until you have a normal period or a positive result.

Q: Hi well I just started lutera birth control and this is currently my 5th day on lutera. On my 5th day I had unprotected sex but he didn’t come inside me I was wondering if I could get pregnant? Should I worry? Btw I didn’t start the pill while on my period.

Yes, pregnancy is possible but your risk is low. Do not stop taking your pills. When you open your next pack of pills, take a pregnancy test. Use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, repeat the test two weeks later just to be on the safe side. Do not stop taking your birth control pills unless you test positive for pregnancy. In the meantime, please use condoms in addition to your birth control pills until you have been on the pill for at least two weeks straight.

Q: what will happen if i have unprotected sex and take a infection pill after will it stop me from getting a std

No.  There are only certain medications that cure certain STDs. Taking one antibiotic pill will not prevent you from getting an STD if you are exposed to one.

Q: What if I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend while on my period and he nutted, an hour later i took plan B but then a few days later I began releasing heavy bloodclots. I took a pregnancy test but it came out negative. However, I am still bleeding on the third day and I am feeling super sleepy all of the time now.

Irregular bleeding is one of the most common side effects of Plan B. However, if you are experiencing bleeding that is heavier than your normal period, you may want to contact a medical provider for evaluation (especially if your bleeding continues for longer than a week).

Q: I had sex while being treated for Chlamydia (on the third day of treatment) is it possible that he isnt infected?

It’s possible, but you still need to report it to the provider who is treating you.  Your partner may have been infected since your treatment may not have cured the infection yet. He should be tested and presumptively treated just in case.

Q: My last period was april 25th – 27th…I had been on the same birth control for over a year at that point. On May 12 (a Saturday), I had sex with my boyfriend and he came inside me. We didn’t use a condom and were just depending on my birth control. I started a brand new kind of birth control that Sunday (May 13)…I have been getting these awful dizzy spells and have been feeling really nauseous…I can’t tell if it’s just my new birth control (Lutera) or if it’s the possibility I could be pregnant??? The dizziness and nausea are not major side effects of Lutera, so I’m not sure…Could I be pregnant?

As long as there was no gap of time between your old birth control pill and your new one, and as long as you didn’t miss any pills by more than 24 hours, pregnancy is highly unlikely. More than likely, your symptoms are being caused by the change in hormones. The only way to know for sure, however, is to take a pregnancy test. Contact the provider who prescribed your new pill and report your symptoms. They can help you manage your side effects, and if necessary, may want to change your pill. It is especially important to report any of the following warning signs (symptoms that could mean you are experiencing a more serious problem):

  • Abdominal pain (severe)
  • Chest Pain (severe), cough, shortness of breath
  • Headache (severe) with blurred vision, weakness, difficulty speaking
  • Eye problems-vision loss or blurring
  • Leg Pain (severe)

If you have anyof the above symptoms, it may or may not be related to the pill. However, it is necessary to report them to your provider.

Q: Can you tell if u have a std in 48 hours

It depends on the STD.  It can take less than 48 hours for individuals to show symptoms of pubic lice. Usually, though, it takes a bit longer than 48 hours for most other STDs.  If you are experiencing symptoms though, you really ought to be evaluated by a medical practitioner. You may be experiencing an unrelated medical problem.

Please keep in mind that some STDs (like HIV) have no initial symptoms. What’s more, you have to wait at least three months after possible exposure to be tested. When you are tested for HIV, the test does not look for the virus itself. Instead, it looks for HIV-specific antibodies. It takes your body 6-12 weeks to develop these antibodies. 

Because many STDs have no initial symptoms, it is a good idea for all sexually active individuals to be tested regularly (at least annually).

When symptoms are present, they are more likely to be present in men than in women. STD-related symptoms include:

  • Painful urination, a frequent urge to urinate; pain during sexual intercourse and/or dull pelvic pain (for females), pain while ejaculating and/or scrotal pain (for males).
  • Discharge from the penis, vagina, or anus.
  • Low grade fever, achiness, swollen glands, and sore throat.
  • Itching or an annoying tingling sensation in the genital area.
  • Rashes or redness/swelling in the genital area.
  • Bumps, blisters, warts, or sores in the genital area.

If you are sexually active and live near one of our offices, please call us for a free STD screening visit. If you live further away, contact the provider of your choice, or visit the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: my girl n i had sex wit a condom on da 14 her period came on on the 18 for 3 days a week later she threw up n has ben sick does it mean she is pregnant? she was on pills earlier in the month then stopped.

Not necessarily. She definitely was not protected by the pill if she had stopped using it prior to the intercourse. However, as long as you used the condom correctly, as long as there was no penis-vagina contact without a condom, and as long as the condom was intact when you withdrew, pregnancy is highly unlikely. It is even more unlikely since your girlfriend had three days of bleeding after the intercourse. Her nausea and vomiting may simply be a stomach virus.

Unfortunately, the only way to know for sure is to take a pregnancy test. Your girlfriend should use first morning urine for the best results. If it is negative, have her repeat the test every two weeks until she has a normal period or a positive result.

In the meantime, please continue to use condoms.  Condoms work best when they are used correctly and consistently. Here are some tips for correct condom use.

  • Always check the expiration date to be sure it is not expired prior to use.
  • Condoms should be stored at room temperature in a sharps free environment.
  • Never use an oil-based lubricant with a latex condom. If you need additional lubricant, use a water-based type like KY Jelly or Astroglide.
  • Pinch the tip of the condom between the thumb and forefinger while rolling it onto the erect penis to ensure that there is no air pocket in the tip of the condom.
  • Smooth out the sides of the condom once it has been rolled on to ensure there are no air pockets in the sides of the condom.
  • Hold onto the rim or base of the condom while removing the penis from the vagina to prevent it from slipping off inside the vagina during removal.
  • Do not have any penis-vagina contact without a condom.

If your girlfriend did not like the pill, she should be aware that there are many other different types of hormonal contraceptives besides the pill. If you live near one of our offices, please call us for an appointment to discuss your birth control options. If you live further away, contact the Family Planning or Planned Parenthood office closest to you.

Q: Me and my boyfriend have been trying to have a baby. We’ve been having sex for over two months already. We basically did it everyday once or twice and I still dont understand how I can’t get pregnant. I’ve also had sex during my period and nothing. How can this be possible? I had also tried during my “14th” day and nothing.

Sometimes it can take several months to become pregnant. On average, it can to 6 to 9 months for conception to occur.

In the meantime, research information about fertility awareness. You will find helpful information about keeping track of your periods and determining your fertile time. You may want to begin charting your morning temperature and observing your cervical mucus.

If you do not achieve pregnancy after at least 1 year of trying, you may want to consider making an appointment with an ob/gyn doctor who specializes in fertility.

Q: I have just got done doing treatments for a yeast infection almost a week ago, today I was suppose to start my period but havent. Could I prego? I had sex twice once when I had just started my treatment then next after my treatment. Im on birth control pills tho. Just wondering cause my periods are very regular.

Yeast medications usually do not decrease the effectiveness of your birth control pills. Additionally, as long as you have been taking your pills correctly & consistently, you should not become pregnant. Sometimes, infections/illnesses can cause your cycle to be irregular.

Continue taking your pills every day. If you are concerned about pregnancy, do a pregnancy test.

Q: If your on the green pills(sugar pills) and you have sex and let the guy cum in you are you still prtected?

As long as you have been taking your active birth control pills correctly & consistently, you are still protected from pregnancy during your inactive, or “green pill” week. Just remember to begin a new pack of pills on time.

Q: hi.. i wanted to know if anyone can answer accurately. it is 3 days before i’m supposed to ovulate. i usually have increasing CM starting a few days before ovulation; however, i do have what would be considered dry CM. could i be pregnant and that is why i don’t have the CM fluids i should?

If you are having unprotected intercourse, there is always the risk of pregnancy. Keep in mind that cervical mucus changes are based on hormones. It is normal to have hormonal fluctuations from month to month. These fluctuations cause changes in mucus, timing of ovulation, and timing of bleeding.

Wait until your next period. If it is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: I’ve been on birth control for about a year. I started a new month and had sex on the fifth day of that packet. What is the likelihood I could be pregnant?

If you are taking your birth control pills correctly & consistently, it is unlikely that you would become pregnant.

Q: I started birth control but i shortly quit taking it, had my period when i started and had unprotected sex couple days after my period. He did stay in my when he ejaculated. What are my chances that i am pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If you were not taking the birth control pills, you were not protected from pregnancy. Once you stop taking the pills, the protection is no long effective….there is no “carry over” effect.

Wait until your next period. If it is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test. If you are not planning a pregnancy, and you wish to restart the pills or  begin another birth control method, contact your doctor or clinic to discuss your options.

Q: if i had sex but i dont know if my boyfriend came or not cause we didnt use a condom should i take the plan b pill anyway

If you are unsure about being protected, the Plan B is a good option. Plan B helps prevent pregnancy by delaying ovulation. It is generally safe for most all women. Keep in mind that, after taking Plan B, you should have a period within 2-3 weeks. If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test. 

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: Ok i just started birth control this month and now for about a week ive been cramping and tiday i went to the bathroom and when i wiped there was light pink spot. my bf and i had sex about a month ago but.we used a condom and it didnt break or slip off. is it just my body getting used to the birth control?

It can take your body 1 to 3 months to become adjusted to being on the birth control pills. During this time, you may experience some irregular spotting or bleeding. Continue taking your pills every day, at a regular time. This spotting should go away within the next month or so.

Q: my period was 3 days late, i had sexual intercourse the day of ovulation but did not start getting pains in my stomach till about 2 weeks later and now my period lasted only 3 days, not as heavy as usual but cramping bad. do you think im pregnant?

If you had a normal period, then you are not pregnant. However, if you feel that your recent period was not normal, doing a home pregnancy may put your mind at ease.

The timing, length and amount of bleeding may vary from month to month, so having lighter or heavier periods is not uncommon. This is caused by the normal hormonal fluctuations that occur within the menstrual cycle.

Q: my LMP was 15th April 2012 had unprotected sex on the 8th may I was supposed to get my period 20th May and nothing. I’ve been experiencing cramps headaches nausea and fatigue my breast have become tender. I have done 2 HPTs both negative. I have woken this morning had very light pink discharge. could I be pregnant?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. However, if your last period started on April 15, May 8th would most likely have been during your less fertile time. Many things can affect your cycle, causing ovulation to occur earlier or later than usual. If ovulation occurs earlier or later, and conception has not occurred, the timing of your period may be earlier or later than usual. Additionally, things like stress, illness, hormonal fluctuations, and changes in exercise or sleep patterns may cause your period to be irregular.

Repeat the pregnancy test agiain in another week. If it continues to be negative, and you still have not had a period, consult with your doctor or clinic for further evaluation.

Q: First of all I have never had sex, but on the 15th of april i missed my period and I gave my boyfriend a hand job for the first time. he says he did not cum and i had shorts and underwear on however that night i just slept in underwear (with him, he slept naked). I am not almost 2 months late, one moth since the hand job. is it possible I am pregnant? can you get pregnant trough clothes?

No, you cannot get pregnant through clothes. In order for pregnancy to occur, the penis has to deliver sperm into the vagina. You cannot get pregnant by giving a hand job or blow job.

Many things can affect a woman’s cycle. Things like stress, illness, hormonal fluctuations, and changes in exercise or sleep patterns can cause periods to come earlier, later, or occasionally, not at all. Skipping a period here and there (as long as you’re not sexually active) is usually not a concern. Your body will most likely return to having a normal cycle within the next month.

However, if you continue to miss periods, you may want to discuss this with your doctor or clinic.

Q: what infection makes you have bloody sputum and milkish discharge. some times i will have sore in my dick after intercourse

If you are having abnormal discharge from your penis, it would be a good idea to call your doctor or clinic for an STD screening.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: I am 6 weeks pregnant and this morning i had a little blood clot and light bleeding, is this a cause for concern?

Usually not, but it is a good idea to call your ob/gyn doctor. He/she may want to see you for further evaluation.

Q: disadvantages of sex with 4 month pregenant lady

Sex during pregnancy is usually okay unless there are problems. Discuss this with your partner’s ob/gyn doctor if there are concerns.

If this pregnant woman is not your “regular” partner, then there is the risk of being infected with sexually transmitted infections. Although pregnant women are usually tested for infections like chlamydia and gonorrhea, other STD’s (Herpes, HPV, HIV) may be present.

Q: My period ended and i didnt start back on my bc until a week and a half after my period. i had alot of unprotected sex. i did take a plan b like 3 days after the last time having sex but could i be pregnant if i started my bc a week and a half late after my period ended and had unprotected sex???

Yes, you could have become pregnant while having unprotected intercourse. If you were not taking the birth control pills, then you were not protected. Plan B helps prevent pregnancy by delaying ovulation. It is most effective when taken within 24 to 72 hours after unprotected sex, but may be somewhat effective when taken as long as 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. Neither Plan B nor the “regular” birth control pills affect an already existing pregnancy. They do not harm a pregnancy or cause a termination (miscarriage).

Continue taking your birth control pills every day. If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test. Be sure to begin your next pack on time. If you cannot begin a new pack as scheduled, use condoms or abstinence until you have taken the pills for at least 7 consecutive days.

Q: ive not had a period in a month then my boyfriend cumed in me lastnight could i be prego

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If you became pregnancy last night, it would be too soon to be detected by a urine pregnancy test. However, it is possible that you became pregnant within the past month or so, previous to last night. If your period is late, do a pregnancy test.

If you are not planning a pregnancy, consider abstaining from sex or using condoms. You might want to consider starting a birth control method like the birth control pills, patch, or Depo Provera injection. Remember, too, that emergency contraceptives, like Plan B, are also available.

Q: if i was treated for trichomonias and drank like 26 hours later will my treatment work

Yes, as long as you took the medication as instructed, it will still be effective.

Q: i had sex the day before and of my ovalation and is now 2 days late could i be pregnant?

Yes, anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. If your period is late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: if i had a period about two or three weeks ago should my period have came by now or could i be pregnant?(sn…unprotected sex all the time trying to have a baby)

Most women have a period every 21 to 28 days. If your period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: hi,I went for an ovarian cyst removal the 24th of april…and my cycle started the 8-10 may and I had sex on the 12 of may I’m feeling nausea and bloated and I was wondering could I be pregnant? I have fallen pregnant before but had a miscarriage in october,am I more fertile? just wondering?

If you had unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. Ovarian cysts generally do affect fertility. There is no reason to think that you would not have ovulated or be fertile in May.

If your next period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

Q: I am going through perimenopause and had a child 3 years ago i was supposed to get my period two weeks ago and i took a ovulation test and it was positive. now its negative but I had unprotected sex and then used a spremicide what are my chances of concieving im freaking out now because im real sure it was ovulation

Even throughout the peri-menopausal years, you may still be ovulating. Therefore, if you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. Wait until your next period is due. If your period is more than 1 week late, do a pregnancy test.

Q: I only have sex with my boyfriend at least 4 times a month. We dont live together. Is there some type of birth control were i wouldn’t have to take a pill every day? We always use condoms but at moment we do get tempted to have sex with out it. I know it is a big risk. I personally don’t think I should take birth control because we don’t have sex often. I really need some advise please help.

You are correct that having unprotected intercourse is a risk for pregnancy. Condoms are a good method when used correctly and consistently…this means with each act of intercourse.

I understand your feeling about not wanting to take hormones on a daily basis. At this time, the options for non-hormonal contraception are the Copper T IUD, or the diaphragm.

The IUD is a “T” shaped device that the doctor inserts into your uterus. This is a relatively easy procedure, and is done in the doctor’s office. This type of IUD, has no hormones in it. Therefore, it does not regulate your periods. It does provide constant contraception that is effective for 10 years. The IUD can be removed at any time.

The diaphragm is a silicone dome shaped device that is inserted by the woman prior to sexual intercourse. A spermicide gel is applied to the diaphragm. It is inserted into the vagina, and is positioned over the cervix. This is a barrier method; it prevents sperm from entering the cervix. The gel helps kill sperm. The diaphragm must be fitted by a doctor or nurse practitioner.  It must be inserted into the vagina prior to sexual activity, and a new applicatorful of spermicide must be applied in the vagina for each new sex act. After intercourse, the diaphgram must remain in place for at least 6 to 8 hours. After this time, it is removed, washed and stored in a dry case. 

The diaphragm can be very effective, again, when used correctly and consistently.You must have access to your diaphragm in order to use it.

Keep in mind, you do not have to be sexually active to be on the birth control pills. Many women use pills for reasons other than pregnancy prevention. Pills help regulate your menstrual cycle, help to shorten and lighten your periods, and help decrease cramping. Other health benefits are  a decrease in decrease in ovarian and endometrial cancers, prevention of ovarian cysts, decrease in ectopic pregnancy, improvement of acne, and others.

Search for more information about contraceptive options. Review the pros and cons of each.  Discuss the options with your partner. You may also want to make an appointment with your doctor or clinic to review your options.

Family Planning Plus clinics offer gynecological exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and emergency contraception for little to no cost, depending on your household size and income. STD screenings are free for men and women of all ages. Please feel free to schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations.

 

Q: my boyfrienend came in me four times on april 27th and today i just got my period whats going on ?am i pregnant or not ?

Anytime you have unprotected intercourse, there is the risk of pregnancy. However, if you are

having a normal period, then you most likely are not pregnant.

Useful Info

HOLIDAY

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Locations

Lewisburg

4612 Westbranch Highway
Lewisburg, PA 17837
FP: 570-523-3600
WIC: 570-523-6666

Lewistown

99 North Juniata Street
Lewistown, PA 17044
FP: 717-248-0175
WIC: 717-248-5339

Selinsgrove

713 Bridge Street, Suite 7
Selinsgrove, PA 17870
FP: 570-372-0637
WIC: 570-374-8261

Shamokin

10 East Independence Street
Shamokin, PA 17872
FP: 570-648-0582
WIC: 570-648-1521

Sunbury

315 Market Street
Sunbury, PA 17801
WIC: 570-988-1945